Burnley vs Liverpool: Djimi Traore’s infamous own goal and the Anfield legend who spurred him on to Champions League glory

30 Aug

Liverpool sit top of the Premier League and will be hoping to maintain their faultless start to the season when they travel to Burnley on Saturday.

The match – which you can listen to LIVE on talkSPORT – will be another test of the Reds title credentials, with Burnley collecting four points from their opening three games.

Djimi Traore was part of the Liverpool side that lost to Burnley in 2005
Getty Images - Getty

Jurgen Klopp’s side will be hoping to avoid just a third defeat at Turf Moor since 2005, the year they embarrassingly sparked their own downfall against the Clarets.

On a cold Tuesday night in January, Rafael Benitez fielded a weakened Liverpool side in the hope of progressing to the fourth round of the FA Cup without placing too much burden on his first-team regulars.

Djimi Traore, who will go down as one of the most awkward looking players ever, was among the more senior members of the side for the tie.

Zak Whitbread, David Raven, Darren Potter and John Welsh are some of the youngsters he was alongside, with Anfield hero Sami Hyypia also in defence.

The home side looked at ease in the strong wind and rugged pitch, compared to their Premier League opponents, who had been caught cold.

Without Steven Gerrard and Jamie Carragher, Liverpool lacked a focal point and Jerzy Dudek was the considerably busier goalkeeper.

Having survived the first half, Liverpool would soon find themselves falling behind in comical fashion.

Under little pressure, Traore ran back to prevent a low cross from Richard Chaplow, but his feet suddenly became disengaged with his brain.

The defender stumbled and staggered before producing a pirouette style drag-back to put the ball into his own net, for what would prove to be the winning goal.

Traore looks set to clear the ball under little pressure
Sky
But he somehow turns the ball into his own net
Sky

Just 14 minutes later, with the Reds searching for an equaliser, it was Traore who was hauled off the pitch with forward Milan Baros replacing him.

Liverpool failed to score though, and they fell out the FA Cup.

Despite the loss the moment became iconic, with witty Reds fans singing an ode to the Malian with the twisted feet to the tune of Blame it on the Boogie by Michael Jackson.

Don’t blame it on the Biscan,
Don’t blame it on the Hamann,
Don’t blame it on the Finnan,
Blame it on Traore,
He just can’t, He just can’t,
He just can’t control his feet.

It wasn’t to be the end of Traore’s season, however, and while the error left him shaken, he was about to become a key figure in the club’s history for all the right reasons.

Speaking on the Liverpool FC podcast, Traore was asked to reflect on the own goal, which had the potential to ruin his time in football.

“Of course, it was the lowest point of my [Liverpool] career, I was down for a couple of days,” he said.

“I was hurt you know to score an own goal, not blame anyone or anything it was me and the coach took me off straight away, that is no problem, that is normal and after that of course, I take a lot of stick from the fans and everyone, but my teammates stood by me.”

Traore said he was helped by Jamie Carragher
getty

Traore says the support from Liverpool legend Jamie Carragher helped him through a difficult period.
“I remember the next day in the locker room, Carragher came and spoke with me and said ‘keep up, it is nothing’ because he has been there as well and he said, ‘Djimi, I think you have had a good season and done well for us, keep going and keep your head up’, and it showed my character and how I was mentally, never to give up and not to let it affect me.”

Djimi Traore looks distraught following his own goal against Burnley
Getty Images - Getty

Over the years, it has become the match Traore is most associated with from his career, but insists it has never bothered him.

“Of course, when people talk about me or mention my name or when you go to YouTube, the first thing you see is own goal and for me it is like whatever,” he added.

“It is only a football game, yes it was a bad own goal because it cost us qualification for the FA Cup, but a few weeks later I was still in the team and I see that confidence from the head coach Rafa and he said come on you need to move on from that.”

Carragher’s words of advice would be the perfect remedy for Traore.

Traore celebrates with Djibril Cisse after the Champions League final
AFP

He ended the campaign as a Champions League winner, starting at left-back as Liverpool came from 3-0 down to beat AC Milan on penalties.

Not bad for a man who couldn’t control his feet.

Saturday is GameDay on talkSPORT and talkSPORT 2 as we become your go to destination for all the Premier League action.

We’ll bring you LIVE commentary of Premier League games across all three time slots on Saturday – 12.30pm, 3pm and 5.30pm – including Liverpool’s trip to Burnley this weekend.

Liverpool vs Chelsea UEFA Super Cup: What happened next to the stars of 2005 Champions League victory as Reds return to Istanbul

14 Aug

Liverpool are returning to Istanbul 14 years after their Champions League triumph over AC Milan.

Rafael Benitez’s side famously came back from 3-0 down at half-time to win on penalties in 2005.

They return to Turkey as the current European champions to face Chelsea in the UEFA Super Cup, with commentary live on talkSPORT.

Liverpool came from 3-0 down to beat AC Milan on penalties
Getty - Contributor

Here is what happened to those players following that unbelievable night.

Jerzy Dudek

Left Liverpool in 2007 to become Iker Casillas’ deputy at Real Madrid, where he spent four seasons before retiring in 2011.

Jerzy Dudek was a hero in the penalty shootout before being replaced in Liverpool’s goal by Pep Reina
Getty - Contributor

Steve Finnan

Spent an injury-affected season at Espanyol after leaving Anfield in 2008 and then joined Portsmouth, retiring after their 2010 FA Cup final defeat to Chelsea. Currently involved with London-based construction firm Finnan Developments.

Djimi Traore

After spells at Charlton, Birmingham, Monaco and Marseille, the Frenchman spent two years in the United States with the Seattle Sounders before retiring in 2014. He is now one of the assistant coaches with the Major League Soccer club.

Sami Hyypia

He bid farewell to Anfield in 2009 and headed to Bayer Leverkusen where he finished his playing career before becoming assistant manager and then manager.

After being sacked in April 2014 he became Brighton boss in June but lasted just six months. He spent the 2015/16 season in charge of Swiss side FC Zurich before being dismissed. He now has a keen interest in ice hockey and motocross.

Jamie Carragher

The centre-back retired in 2013 after 737 appearances for Liverpool and has since become a Sky Sports pundit.

John Arne Riise

Riise spent three years with Roma after leaving Anfield in 2008 before returning to England with Fulham.

He then went on to have spells with APOEL in Cyprus, Indian club Delhi Dynamos, Norwegian outfit Aalesund and Indian side Chennaiyin before hanging up his boots.

He had a brief spell as technical director of Maltese club Birkirkara earlier this year before resigning due to personal reasons.

Dietmar Hamann and John Arne Risse celebrate in Istanbul in 2005
Getty - Contributor

Steven Gerrard

The final player from that night in Istanbul to depart Anfield, Gerrard left his boyhood club in 2015 to tackle a new challenge with the Los Angeles Galaxy.

He spent a year in America before retiring in November 2016, and 18 months later was handed the managerial reins at Scottish club Rangers.

Steve Gerrard was the last player to leave the club
AFP - Getty

Luis Garcia

After his departure for Atletico Madrid in 2007 the Spaniard spent two seasons in the Spanish capital before spells at Racing Santander, Panathinaikos and Mexican sides Puebla Club and Universidad Nacional.

He announced his retirement in January 2014 only to make a short-lived comeback for newly formed Indian Super League franchise Atletico de Kolkata, with another brief stint following in Australia with the Central Coast Mariners in 2016.

Xabi Alonso

Played a pivotal role for Real Madrid for five seasons after his Liverpool exit in 2009, culminating in the club’s 10th Champions League victory in 2014. Alonso then spent three years patrolling Bayern Munich’s midfield and returned to Madrid to coach Real’s under-14s in 2018 before moving last month back to his first professional club, Real Sociedad, to take charge of their youth team.

Harry Kewell

The Australian left Anfield for Galatasaray in 2008 for three seasons and returned home to play for Melbourne Victory and Melbourne Heart – either side of a short spell with Qatari’s Al-Gharafa – where he retired in March 2014.

He has since taken his first steps in management with Watford’s youth team, Crawley and most recently Notts County.

Milan Baros

Left for Aston Villa immediately after the Istanbul win and later played for Lyon, Portsmouth and Galatasaray before three times rejoining Banik Ostrava – the club he originally left in 2001 to join Liverpool – amid stints with Turkish side Antalyaspor and Czech outfits Mlada Boleslav and Slovan Liberec.

Dietmar Hamann

Left for Manchester City after Liverpool’s 2006 FA Cup win, having initially agreed to join Bolton, before finishing his playing career in 2011 at Milton Keynes Dons where he was player-coach.

Hamann joined Leicester as first-team coach before a short, ill-fated spell as manager of newly relegated Conference Premier side Stockport. Now a media pundit.

Vladimir Smicer

His last Liverpool appearance was the final, in which he scored, and his career could never match up to those heights. He spent two seasons with Bordeaux before returning to first professional club Slavia Prague and retiring in May 2010.

Getty Images - Getty
Vladimir Smicer scored one of the goals that helped Liverpool come back from 3-0 down[/caption]

Djibril Cisse

Enjoyed a nomadic existence after leaving Anfield in 2006, with stints at Marseille, Sunderland, Panathinaikos, Lazio, QPR, Al-Gharafa and Kuban Krasnodar before returning to his homeland with Bastia and then briefly Saint-Pierroise.

Having announced his retirement due to injury in October 2015, he hoped to make a comeback but announced his retirement again in February 2017 and told Yahoo Sport, where he was set to work as a pundit: “I’m going to give myself body and soul to my career as a DJ, a producer, and as a pundit, as well as develop my line of clothing.”

He came out of retirement again to play for Swiss side Yverdon two years ago and then Italian Serie D team AC Vicenza 1902 last year.

Steven Gerrard and Rafael Benitez celebrate with the Champions League trophy in 2005
AFP - Getty

Manager: Rafael Benitez

Disagreements with the owners and failing results resulted in the Spaniard leaving Anfield in 2010. A similar scenario saw him sacked after just six months in charge at Inter Milan.

He succeeded Roberto Di Matteo at Chelsea despite being deeply unpopular at Stamford Bridge because of his Liverpool connections but did lead them to Europa League glory in 2013.

He then joined Napoli shortly afterwards, winning the Coppa Italia in his first season, and guiding them to within one goal of the 2015 Europa League final. Named Real Madrid boss in June 2015 but lasted little over six months, before in March 2016 being handed the Newcastle reins. Could not save the Magpies from relegation but guided them straight back up, before stepping down when his contract expired in June this year. Benitez was named manager of Chinese side Dalian Yifang last month.

Liverpool vs Chelsea UEFA Super Cup: What happened next to the stars of 2005 Champions League victory as Reds return to Istanbul

14 Aug

Liverpool are returning to Istanbul 14 years after their Champions League triumph over AC Milan.

Rafael Benitez’s side famously came back from 3-0 down at half-time to win on penalties in 2005.

They return to Turkey as the current European champions to face Chelsea in the UEFA Super Cup, with commentary live on talkSPORT.

Liverpool came from 3-0 down to beat AC Milan on penalties
Getty - Contributor

Here is what happened to those players following that unbelievable night.

Jerzy Dudek

Left Liverpool in 2007 to become Iker Casillas’ deputy at Real Madrid, where he spent four seasons before retiring in 2011.

Jerzy Dudek was a hero in the penalty shootout before being replaced in Liverpool’s goal by Pep Reina
Getty - Contributor

Steve Finnan

Spent an injury-affected season at Espanyol after leaving Anfield in 2008 and then joined Portsmouth, retiring after their 2010 FA Cup final defeat to Chelsea. Currently involved with London-based construction firm Finnan Developments.

Djimi Traore

After spells at Charlton, Birmingham, Monaco and Marseille, the Frenchman spent two years in the United States with the Seattle Sounders before retiring in 2014. He is now one of the assistant coaches with the Major League Soccer club.

Sami Hyypia

He bid farewell to Anfield in 2009 and headed to Bayer Leverkusen where he finished his playing career before becoming assistant manager and then manager.

After being sacked in April 2014 he became Brighton boss in June but lasted just six months. He spent the 2015/16 season in charge of Swiss side FC Zurich before being dismissed. He now has a keen interest in ice hockey and motocross.

Jamie Carragher

The centre-back retired in 2013 after 737 appearances for Liverpool and has since become a Sky Sports pundit.

John Arne Riise

Riise spent three years with Roma after leaving Anfield in 2008 before returning to England with Fulham.

He then went on to have spells with APOEL in Cyprus, Indian club Delhi Dynamos, Norwegian outfit Aalesund and Indian side Chennaiyin before hanging up his boots.

He had a brief spell as technical director of Maltese club Birkirkara earlier this year before resigning due to personal reasons.

Dietmar Hamann and John Arne Risse celebrate in Istanbul in 2005
Getty - Contributor

Steven Gerrard

The final player from that night in Istanbul to depart Anfield, Gerrard left his boyhood club in 2015 to tackle a new challenge with the Los Angeles Galaxy.

He spent a year in America before retiring in November 2016, and 18 months later was handed the managerial reins at Scottish club Rangers.

Steve Gerrard was the last player to leave the club
AFP - Getty

Luis Garcia

After his departure for Atletico Madrid in 2007 the Spaniard spent two seasons in the Spanish capital before spells at Racing Santander, Panathinaikos and Mexican sides Puebla Club and Universidad Nacional.

He announced his retirement in January 2014 only to make a short-lived comeback for newly formed Indian Super League franchise Atletico de Kolkata, with another brief stint following in Australia with the Central Coast Mariners in 2016.

Xabi Alonso

Played a pivotal role for Real Madrid for five seasons after his Liverpool exit in 2009, culminating in the club’s 10th Champions League victory in 2014. Alonso then spent three years patrolling Bayern Munich’s midfield and returned to Madrid to coach Real’s under-14s in 2018 before moving last month back to his first professional club, Real Sociedad, to take charge of their youth team.

Harry Kewell

The Australian left Anfield for Galatasaray in 2008 for three seasons and returned home to play for Melbourne Victory and Melbourne Heart – either side of a short spell with Qatari’s Al-Gharafa – where he retired in March 2014.

He has since taken his first steps in management with Watford’s youth team, Crawley and most recently Notts County.

Milan Baros

Left for Aston Villa immediately after the Istanbul win and later played for Lyon, Portsmouth and Galatasaray before three times rejoining Banik Ostrava – the club he originally left in 2001 to join Liverpool – amid stints with Turkish side Antalyaspor and Czech outfits Mlada Boleslav and Slovan Liberec.

Dietmar Hamann

Left for Manchester City after Liverpool’s 2006 FA Cup win, having initially agreed to join Bolton, before finishing his playing career in 2011 at Milton Keynes Dons where he was player-coach.

Hamann joined Leicester as first-team coach before a short, ill-fated spell as manager of newly relegated Conference Premier side Stockport. Now a media pundit.

Vladimir Smicer

His last Liverpool appearance was the final, in which he scored, and his career could never match up to those heights. He spent two seasons with Bordeaux before returning to first professional club Slavia Prague and retiring in May 2010.

Getty Images - Getty
Vladimir Smicer scored one of the goals that helped Liverpool come back from 3-0 down[/caption]

Djibril Cisse

Enjoyed a nomadic existence after leaving Anfield in 2006, with stints at Marseille, Sunderland, Panathinaikos, Lazio, QPR, Al-Gharafa and Kuban Krasnodar before returning to his homeland with Bastia and then briefly Saint-Pierroise.

Having announced his retirement due to injury in October 2015, he hoped to make a comeback but announced his retirement again in February 2017 and told Yahoo Sport, where he was set to work as a pundit: “I’m going to give myself body and soul to my career as a DJ, a producer, and as a pundit, as well as develop my line of clothing.”

He came out of retirement again to play for Swiss side Yverdon two years ago and then Italian Serie D team AC Vicenza 1902 last year.

Steven Gerrard and Rafael Benitez celebrate with the Champions League trophy in 2005
AFP - Getty

Manager: Rafael Benitez

Disagreements with the owners and failing results resulted in the Spaniard leaving Anfield in 2010. A similar scenario saw him sacked after just six months in charge at Inter Milan.

He succeeded Roberto Di Matteo at Chelsea despite being deeply unpopular at Stamford Bridge because of his Liverpool connections but did lead them to Europa League glory in 2013.

He then joined Napoli shortly afterwards, winning the Coppa Italia in his first season, and guiding them to within one goal of the 2015 Europa League final. Named Real Madrid boss in June 2015 but lasted little over six months, before in March 2016 being handed the Newcastle reins. Could not save the Magpies from relegation but guided them straight back up, before stepping down when his contract expired in June this year. Benitez was named manager of Chinese side Dalian Yifang last month.