Rugby World Cup 2019: England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland preview as bids to claim the Webb Ellis trophy in Japan start

19 Sep

The Rugby World Cup starts on Friday with plenty of expectation for all the Home Nations.

The opening fixture sees hosts Japan take on Russia in Tokyo on Friday before Ireland, Scotland and England get their campaigns underway on Sunday followed by Wales on Monday.

The 2019 tournament is perhaps the most wide open in years with Ireland ranked as the number one side in the world while New Zealand and South Africa have been drawn in the same group.

Joe Cokanasiga will be playing in his first World Cup for England
Getty Images - Getty

Here at talkSPORT.com we have taken a look at what all four home nations can expect from the tournament.

England

Four years have past since England’s humiliating exit from the Rugby World Cup on home soil that saw them not get past the pool stage.

Their route to the knockout stages may be slightly easier in 2019 but Eddie Jones’ side will be wary of the potential banana skins ahead of them.

This time the tournament is in Japan in surroundings that Jones will no doubt be comfortable in.

He is of Japanese heritage and was coach of their national team at the 2015 World Cup in England where he masterminded their win over South Africa.

The 59-year-old was also head coach of Australia when they were beaten by England in the 2003 final and was also part of the South African coaching staff when they won in 2007.

Jones was appointed in November 2015 so he would have four years to prepare for this tournament.

In his first two years, England could not stop winning as they won back-to-back Six Nations Championships.

The last two years have been a little more inconsistent, with a draw and defeat to Scotland the most notable results, as he has looked to find his best side.

Jones’ record has been strong overall with 34 wins from 44 games with nine defeats and a draw.

England possess some genuine world class talent with an array of pace and power at their disposal.

Key players

Maro Itoje – lock

The 24-year-old lock is in the prime of his career and if England harbour any hopes of lifting the Webb Ellis trophy in October then he will need to perform.

Itoje’s incredible athleticism makes England dominant at the lineout while he is also an excellent ball carrier.

There are plenty of players in England’s line-up that opponents will fear but Itoje will be chief antagonist at this World Cup.

Maro Itoje has made 29 appearances for England
Getty Images - Getty

Joe Cokanasiga – wing

Cokanasiga may have only played eight Tests for England but he has already been compared to New Zealand great Jonah Lomu.

The 21-year-old, who was born in Fiji, has already scored five tries in those games.

He has incredible speed for a man who is 6ft 4in and weighs 17st 8lb and is a daunting prospect for any opposing defender to tackle.

Joe Cokanasiga plays his club rugby for Bath
Getty - Contributor

Full squad

Forwards; Dan Cole (prop), Luke Cowan-Dickie (hooker), Tom Curry (flanker), Ellis Genge (prop), Jamie George (hooker), Maro Itoje (lock), George Kruis (lock), Joe Launchbury (lock), Courtney Lawes (lock), Lewis Ludlam (flanker), Joe Marler (prop), Kyle Sinckler (prop), Jack Singleton (hooker), Sam Underhill (flanker), Billy Vunipola (No. 8), Mako Vunipola (prop), Mark Wilson (flanker).

Backs; Joe Cokanasiga (wing), Elliot Daly (full-back), Owen Farrell (fly-half), George Ford (fly-half), Piers Francis (centre), Willi Heinz (scrum-half), Jonathan Joseph (centre), Jonny May (wing), Ruaridh McConnochie (wing), Jack Nowell (wing), Henry Slade (centre), Manu Tuilagi (centre), Anthony Watson (wing), Ben Youngs (scrum-half).

Fixtures

Sunday, September 22 – Tonga (11.15am)

Thursday, September 26 – USA (11.45am)

Saturday, October 5 – Argentina (9am)

Saturday, October 12 – France (9.15am)

Prediction

Semi-final

Wales

The 2019 Rugby World Cup will be Warren Gatland’s swansong as Wales head coach.

The 56-year-old has spent 12 years at the helm of Wales rugby with four Six Nations victories, including three Grand Slams.

Gatland was appointed in 2007 after a dismal World Cup and his record has been solid in the tournament.

Eight years ago, they reached the semi-finals and in 2015 they managed to get out of the pool stage that included England and Australia, before losing to South Africa in the last eight.

Warren Gatland will be returning to New Zealand after the Rugby World Cup
Getty Images - Getty

Gatland will want to sign off in style before taking over as head coach of Super Rugby side Chiefs in his native New Zealand.

Strength in depth may hurt Wales as the tournament progresses but they are a reasonable bet to make it out of Pool D.

They are already without Taulupe Faletau and Gareth Anscombe and any more injuries could hurt them.

Their preparation has been far from ideal with coach Rob Howley sent home amid a betting investigation.

Key player

Alun Wyn Jones – lock

The Wales captain may be 34 but he is still at his peak and his country will need all of his 128 caps of experience if they are to progress.

Jones is one of the best in the world at his position and can drag Wales through matches if he is required.

Alun Wyn Jones is two matches away from being Wales’ most capped player
AFP or licensors

Full squad

Forwards; Jake Ball (lock), Adam Beard (lock), Rhys Carre (prop), James Davies (flanker), Elliot Dee (hooker), Ryan Elias (hooker), Tomas Francis (prop), Cory Hill (lock), Wyn Jones (prop), Alun Wyn Jones (lock), Dillon Lewis (prop), Ross Moriarty (No. 8), Josh Navidi (flanker), Ken Owens (hooker), Aaron Shingler (flanker), Nicky Smith (prop), Justin Tipuric (flanker), Aaron Wainwright (flanker).

Backs; Josh Adams (wing), Hallam Amos(wing), Dan Biggar (fly-half), Aled Davies (scrum-half), Gareth Davies (scrum-half), Jonathan Davies (centre), Leigh Halfpenny (full-back), George North (wing), Hadleigh Parkes (centre), Rhys Patchell (fly-half), Owen Watkin (centre), Liam Williams (utility back), Tomos Williams (scrum-half).

Fixtures

Monday, September 23 – Georgia (11.15am)

Sunday, September 29 – Australia (8.45am)

Wednesday, October 9 – Fiji (10.45am)

Sunday, October 13 – Uruguay (9.15am)

Prediction

Quarter-finals

Scotland

Scotland are inconsistent at best and on their day they can cause real problems for the top sides, as England found out at their cost in their last two Calcutta Cup clashes.

The bad days often outweigh the good ones and a strong performance is normally followed by an implosion.

Scotland are easy on the eye with lots of skill and pace but lack the ball-carrying up front to grind out results when Plan A fails.

Key Player

Finn Russell – fly-half

On his day, Russell can be a world beater and virtually unplayable but when he is having an off day then the rest of the team seems to follow.

He has scored 137 points in 46 matches for Scotland and has flourished with Racing 92 at club level.

Finn Russell replaced All Blacks legend Dan Carter at Racing 92
Getty Images - Getty

“The Six Nations was up and down. Against Italy the first half was great, then we let in three late tries,” Russell said before the World Cup. “We had a good first period against Ireland too but slipped off again. Then the England game [a 38-38 draw at Twickenham, in which Scotland trailed by 31 points] was like that but in reverse.

“What was frustrating was we never really managed to put in an 80-minute performance. In a World Cup against the best teams on the planet you have to put in a 80-minute display every game.

“But it should be the real Scotland we see now. This is the main stage, the World Cup, so if it’s not the real Scotland we see then it will be disappointing for all of us.”

Full squad

Forwards; John Barclay (flanker), Simon Berghan (prop), Fraser Brown (hooker), Scott Cummings (lock), Allan Dell (prop), Zander Fagerson (prop), Grant Gilchrist (lock), Jonny Gray (lock), Stuart McInally (hooker), Willem Nel (prop), Gordon Reid (prop), Jamie Ritchie (flanker), Blade Thomson (back-row), Ben Toolis (lock), George Turner (hooker), Hamis Watson (flanker), Ryan Wilson (No. 8).

Backs; Darcy Graham (wing), Chris Harris (centre), Adam Hastings (fly-half), Stuart Hogg (full-back), George Horne (scrum-half), Pete Horne (utility back), Sam Johnson (centre), Blair Kinghorn (full-back), Greig Laidlaw (scrum-half), Sean Maitland (wing), Ali Price (scrum-half), Finn Russell (fly-half), Tommy Seymour (wing), Duncan Taylor (centre).

Fixtures

Sunday, September 22 – Ireland (8.45am)

Monday, September 30 – Samoa (11.15am)

Wednesday, October 9 – Russia (8.15am)

Sunday, October 13 – Japan (11.45am)

Prediction

Pool Stage

Ireland

Ireland went to number one in the world with their warm-up victory over Wales in Dublin as the early indicators for the tournament are good.

Remarkably, only once has the World Cup not been won by a side not occupying that top ranking spot.

Ireland’s record at the tournament has been dismal, though, and they have never won a knockout match in their history.

Their win over New Zealand last November was a sign that they can be world beaters but their recent loss to England may have concerned head coach Joe Schmidt.

They have been handed a relatively kind pool but are likely to face South Africa or New Zealand in the quarter-final.

Key player

Johnny Sexton – fly-half

The world’s best player has had his injury scares ahead of the tournament and a slight dip in form during the Six Nations was uncharacteristic.

Ireland’s hopes will be linked to how well Sexton can perform at the tournament and at 34 it is now or never to guide his side to glory (or at least a knockout win).

Johnny Sexton was named as the best player in the world in 2018
AFP

Full-squad

Forwards; Rory Best (hooker), Tadhg Beirne (lock), Jack Conan (flanker), Sean Cronin (hooker), Tadhg Furlong (prop), Cian Healy (prop), Iain Henderson (lock), Dave Kilcoyne (prop), Jean Kleyn (lock), Peter O’Mahony (flanker), Andrew Porter (prop), Rhys Ruddock (flanker), James Ryan (lock), John Ryan (prop), Niall Scannell (hooker), CJ Stander (flanker), Josh van der Flier (flanker).

Backs; Bundee Aki (centre), Joey Carbery (fly-half), Jack Carty (fly-half), Andrew Conway (utility back), Keith Earls (utility back), Chris Farrell (centre), Robbie Henshaw (centre), Rob Kearney (full-back), Jordan Larmour (wing), Luke McGrath (scrum-half), Conor Murray (scrum-half), Garry Ringrose (centre), Johnny Sexton (fly-half), Jacob Stockdale (wing).

Fixtures

Sunday, September 22 – Scotland (8.45am)

Saturday, September 28 – Japan (8.15am)

Thursday, October 3 – Russia (11.45am)

Saturday, October 12 – Samoa (11.45am)

Prediction

Quarter-final

Rugby World Cup 2019: England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland preview as bids to claim the Webb Ellis trophy in Japan start

19 Sep

The Rugby World Cup starts on Friday with plenty of expectation for all the Home Nations.

The opening fixture sees hosts Japan take on Russia in Tokyo on Friday before Ireland, Scotland and England get their campaigns underway on Sunday followed by Wales on Monday.

The 2019 tournament is perhaps the most wide open in years with Ireland ranked as the number one side in the world while New Zealand and South Africa have been drawn in the same group.

Joe Cokanasiga will be playing in his first World Cup for England
Getty Images - Getty

Here at talkSPORT.com we have taken a look at what all four home nations can expect from the tournament.

England

Four years have past since England’s humiliating exit from the Rugby World Cup on home soil that saw them not get past the pool stage.

Their route to the knockout stages may be slightly easier in 2019 but Eddie Jones’ side will be wary of the potential banana skins ahead of them.

This time the tournament is in Japan in surroundings that Jones will no doubt be comfortable in.

He is of Japanese heritage and was coach of their national team at the 2015 World Cup in England where he masterminded their win over South Africa.

The 59-year-old was also head coach of Australia when they were beaten by England in the 2003 final and was also part of the South African coaching staff when they won in 2007.

Jones was appointed in November 2015 so he would have four years to prepare for this tournament.

In his first two years, England could not stop winning as they won back-to-back Six Nations Championships.

The last two years have been a little more inconsistent, with a draw and defeat to Scotland the most notable results, as he has looked to find his best side.

Jones’ record has been strong overall with 34 wins from 44 games with nine defeats and a draw.

England possess some genuine world class talent with an array of pace and power at their disposal.

Key players

Maro Itoje – lock

The 24-year-old lock is in the prime of his career and if England harbour any hopes of lifting the Webb Ellis trophy in October then he will need to perform.

Itoje’s incredible athleticism makes England dominant at the lineout while he is also an excellent ball carrier.

There are plenty of players in England’s line-up that opponents will fear but Itoje will be chief antagonist at this World Cup.

Maro Itoje has made 29 appearances for England
Getty Images - Getty

Joe Cokanasiga – wing

Cokanasiga may have only played eight Tests for England but he has already been compared to New Zealand great Jonah Lomu.

The 21-year-old, who was born in Fiji, has already scored five tries in those games.

He has incredible speed for a man who is 6ft 4in and weighs 17st 8lb and is a daunting prospect for any opposing defender to tackle.

Joe Cokanasiga plays his club rugby for Bath
Getty - Contributor

Full squad

Forwards; Dan Cole (prop), Luke Cowan-Dickie (hooker), Tom Curry (flanker), Ellis Genge (prop), Jamie George (hooker), Maro Itoje (lock), George Kruis (lock), Joe Launchbury (lock), Courtney Lawes (lock), Lewis Ludlam (flanker), Joe Marler (prop), Kyle Sinckler (prop), Jack Singleton (hooker), Sam Underhill (flanker), Billy Vunipola (No. 8), Mako Vunipola (prop), Mark Wilson (flanker).

Backs; Joe Cokanasiga (wing), Elliot Daly (full-back), Owen Farrell (fly-half), George Ford (fly-half), Piers Francis (centre), Willi Heinz (scrum-half), Jonathan Joseph (centre), Jonny May (wing), Ruaridh McConnochie (wing), Jack Nowell (wing), Henry Slade (centre), Manu Tuilagi (centre), Anthony Watson (wing), Ben Youngs (scrum-half).

Fixtures

Sunday, September 22 – Tonga (11.15am)

Thursday, September 26 – USA (11.45am)

Saturday, October 5 – Argentina (9am)

Saturday, October 12 – France (9.15am)

Prediction

Semi-final

Wales

The 2019 Rugby World Cup will be Warren Gatland’s swansong as Wales head coach.

The 56-year-old has spent 12 years at the helm of Wales rugby with four Six Nations victories, including three Grand Slams.

Gatland was appointed in 2007 after a dismal World Cup and his record has been solid in the tournament.

Eight years ago, they reached the semi-finals and in 2015 they managed to get out of the pool stage that included England and Australia, before losing to South Africa in the last eight.

Warren Gatland will be returning to New Zealand after the Rugby World Cup
Getty Images - Getty

Gatland will want to sign off in style before taking over as head coach of Super Rugby side Chiefs in his native New Zealand.

Strength in depth may hurt Wales as the tournament progresses but they are a reasonable bet to make it out of Pool D.

They are already without Taulupe Faletau and Gareth Anscombe and any more injuries could hurt them.

Their preparation has been far from ideal with coach Rob Howley sent home amid a betting investigation.

Key player

Alun Wyn Jones – lock

The Wales captain may be 34 but he is still at his peak and his country will need all of his 128 caps of experience if they are to progress.

Jones is one of the best in the world at his position and can drag Wales through matches if he is required.

Alun Wyn Jones is two matches away from being Wales’ most capped player
AFP or licensors

Full squad

Forwards; Jake Ball (lock), Adam Beard (lock), Rhys Carre (prop), James Davies (flanker), Elliot Dee (hooker), Ryan Elias (hooker), Tomas Francis (prop), Cory Hill (lock), Wyn Jones (prop), Alun Wyn Jones (lock), Dillon Lewis (prop), Ross Moriarty (No. 8), Josh Navidi (flanker), Ken Owens (hooker), Aaron Shingler (flanker), Nicky Smith (prop), Justin Tipuric (flanker), Aaron Wainwright (flanker).

Backs; Josh Adams (wing), Hallam Amos(wing), Dan Biggar (fly-half), Aled Davies (scrum-half), Gareth Davies (scrum-half), Jonathan Davies (centre), Leigh Halfpenny (full-back), George North (wing), Hadleigh Parkes (centre), Rhys Patchell (fly-half), Owen Watkin (centre), Liam Williams (utility back), Tomos Williams (scrum-half).

Fixtures

Monday, September 23 – Georgia (11.15am)

Sunday, September 29 – Australia (8.45am)

Wednesday, October 9 – Fiji (10.45am)

Sunday, October 13 – Uruguay (9.15am)

Prediction

Quarter-finals

Scotland

Scotland are inconsistent at best and on their day they can cause real problems for the top sides, as England found out at their cost in their last two Calcutta Cup clashes.

The bad days often outweigh the good ones and a strong performance is normally followed by an implosion.

Scotland are easy on the eye with lots of skill and pace but lack the ball-carrying up front to grind out results when Plan A fails.

Key Player

Finn Russell – fly-half

On his day, Russell can be a world beater and virtually unplayable but when he is having an off day then the rest of the team seems to follow.

He has scored 137 points in 46 matches for Scotland and has flourished with Racing 92 at club level.

Finn Russell replaced All Blacks legend Dan Carter at Racing 92
Getty Images - Getty

“The Six Nations was up and down. Against Italy the first half was great, then we let in three late tries,” Russell said before the World Cup. “We had a good first period against Ireland too but slipped off again. Then the England game [a 38-38 draw at Twickenham, in which Scotland trailed by 31 points] was like that but in reverse.

“What was frustrating was we never really managed to put in an 80-minute performance. In a World Cup against the best teams on the planet you have to put in a 80-minute display every game.

“But it should be the real Scotland we see now. This is the main stage, the World Cup, so if it’s not the real Scotland we see then it will be disappointing for all of us.”

Full squad

Forwards; John Barclay (flanker), Simon Berghan (prop), Fraser Brown (hooker), Scott Cummings (lock), Allan Dell (prop), Zander Fagerson (prop), Grant Gilchrist (lock), Jonny Gray (lock), Stuart McInally (hooker), Willem Nel (prop), Gordon Reid (prop), Jamie Ritchie (flanker), Blade Thomson (back-row), Ben Toolis (lock), George Turner (hooker), Hamis Watson (flanker), Ryan Wilson (No. 8).

Backs; Darcy Graham (wing), Chris Harris (centre), Adam Hastings (fly-half), Stuart Hogg (full-back), George Horne (scrum-half), Pete Horne (utility back), Sam Johnson (centre), Blair Kinghorn (full-back), Greig Laidlaw (scrum-half), Sean Maitland (wing), Ali Price (scrum-half), Finn Russell (fly-half), Tommy Seymour (wing), Duncan Taylor (centre).

Fixtures

Sunday, September 22 – Ireland (8.45am)

Monday, September 30 – Samoa (11.15am)

Wednesday, October 9 – Russia (8.15am)

Sunday, October 13 – Japan (11.45am)

Prediction

Pool Stage

Ireland

Ireland went to number one in the world with their warm-up victory over Wales in Dublin as the early indicators for the tournament are good.

Remarkably, only once has the World Cup not been won by a side not occupying that top ranking spot.

Ireland’s record at the tournament has been dismal, though, and they have never won a knockout match in their history.

Their win over New Zealand last November was a sign that they can be world beaters but their recent loss to England may have concerned head coach Joe Schmidt.

They have been handed a relatively kind pool but are likely to face South Africa or New Zealand in the quarter-final.

Key player

Johnny Sexton – fly-half

The world’s best player has had his injury scares ahead of the tournament and a slight dip in form during the Six Nations was uncharacteristic.

Ireland’s hopes will be linked to how well Sexton can perform at the tournament and at 34 it is now or never to guide his side to glory (or at least a knockout win).

Johnny Sexton was named as the best player in the world in 2018
AFP

Full-squad

Forwards; Rory Best (hooker), Tadhg Beirne (lock), Jack Conan (flanker), Sean Cronin (hooker), Tadhg Furlong (prop), Cian Healy (prop), Iain Henderson (lock), Dave Kilcoyne (prop), Jean Kleyn (lock), Peter O’Mahony (flanker), Andrew Porter (prop), Rhys Ruddock (flanker), James Ryan (lock), John Ryan (prop), Niall Scannell (hooker), CJ Stander (flanker), Josh van der Flier (flanker).

Backs; Bundee Aki (centre), Joey Carbery (fly-half), Jack Carty (fly-half), Andrew Conway (utility back), Keith Earls (utility back), Chris Farrell (centre), Robbie Henshaw (centre), Rob Kearney (full-back), Jordan Larmour (wing), Luke McGrath (scrum-half), Conor Murray (scrum-half), Garry Ringrose (centre), Johnny Sexton (fly-half), Jacob Stockdale (wing).

Fixtures

Sunday, September 22 – Scotland (8.45am)

Saturday, September 28 – Japan (8.15am)

Thursday, October 3 – Russia (11.45am)

Saturday, October 12 – Samoa (11.45am)

Prediction

Quarter-final

Rugby World Cup 2019: England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland preview as bids to claim the Webb Ellis trophy in Japan start

19 Sep

The Rugby World Cup starts on Friday with plenty of expectation for all the Home Nations.

The opening fixture sees hosts Japan take on Russia in Tokyo on Friday before Ireland, Scotland and England get their campaigns underway on Sunday followed by Wales on Monday.

The 2019 tournament is perhaps the most wide open in years with Ireland ranked as the number one side in the world while New Zealand and South Africa have been drawn in the same group.

Joe Cokanasiga will be playing in his first World Cup for England
Getty Images - Getty

Here at talkSPORT.com we have taken a look at what all four home nations can expect from the tournament.

England

Four years have passed since England’s humiliating exit from the Rugby World Cup on home soil that saw them not get past the pool stage.

Their route to the knockout stages may be slightly easier in 2019 but Eddie Jones’ side will be wary of the potential banana skins ahead of them.

This time the tournament is in Japan in surroundings that Jones will no doubt be comfortable in.

He is of Japanese heritage and was coach of their national team at the 2015 World Cup in England where he masterminded their win over South Africa.

The 59-year-old was also head coach of Australia when they were beaten by England in the 2003 final and was also part of the South African coaching staff when they won in 2007.

Jones was appointed in November 2015 so he would have four years to prepare for this tournament.

In his first two years, England could not stop winning as they won back-to-back Six Nations Championships.

The last two years have been a little more inconsistent, with a draw and defeat to Scotland the most notable results, as he has looked to find his best side.

Jones’ record has been strong overall with 34 wins from 44 games with nine defeats and a draw.

England possess some genuine world class talent with an array of pace and power at their disposal.

Key players

Maro Itoje – lock

The 24-year-old lock is in the prime of his career and if England harbour any hopes of lifting the Webb Ellis trophy in October then he will need to perform.

Itoje’s incredible athleticism makes England dominant at the lineout while he is also an excellent ball carrier.

There are plenty of players in England’s line-up that opponents will fear but Itoje will be chief antagonist at this World Cup.

Maro Itoje has made 29 appearances for England
Getty Images - Getty

Joe Cokanasiga – wing

Cokanasiga may have only played eight Tests for England but he has already been compared to New Zealand great Jonah Lomu.

The 21-year-old, who was born in Fiji, has already scored five tries in those games.

He has incredible speed for a man who is 6ft 4in and weighs 17st 8lb and is a daunting prospect for any opposing defender to tackle.

Joe Cokanasiga plays his club rugby for Bath
Getty - Contributor

Full squad

Forwards; Dan Cole (prop), Luke Cowan-Dickie (hooker), Tom Curry (flanker), Ellis Genge (prop), Jamie George (hooker), Maro Itoje (lock), George Kruis (lock), Joe Launchbury (lock), Courtney Lawes (lock), Lewis Ludlam (flanker), Joe Marler (prop), Kyle Sinckler (prop), Jack Singleton (hooker), Sam Underhill (flanker), Billy Vunipola (No. 8), Mako Vunipola (prop), Mark Wilson (flanker).

Backs; Joe Cokanasiga (wing), Elliot Daly (full-back), Owen Farrell (fly-half), George Ford (fly-half), Piers Francis (centre), Willi Heinz (scrum-half), Jonathan Joseph (centre), Jonny May (wing), Ruaridh McConnochie (wing), Jack Nowell (wing), Henry Slade (centre), Manu Tuilagi (centre), Anthony Watson (wing), Ben Youngs (scrum-half).

Fixtures

Sunday, September 22 – Tonga (11.15am)

Thursday, September 26 – USA (11.45am)

Saturday, October 5 – Argentina (9am)

Saturday, October 12 – France (9.15am)

Prediction

Semi-final

Wales

The 2019 Rugby World Cup will be Warren Gatland’s swansong as Wales head coach.

The 56-year-old has spent 12 years at the helm of Wales rugby with four Six Nations victories, including three Grand Slams.

Gatland was appointed in 2007 after a dismal World Cup and his record has been solid in the tournament.

Eight years ago, they reached the semi-finals and in 2015 they managed to get out of the pool stage that included England and Australia, before losing to South Africa in the last eight.

Warren Gatland will be returning to New Zealand after the Rugby World Cup
Getty Images - Getty

Gatland will want to sign off in style before taking over as head coach of Super Rugby side Chiefs in his native New Zealand.

Strength in depth may hurt Wales as the tournament progresses but they are a reasonable bet to make it out of Pool D.

They are already without Taulupe Faletau and Gareth Anscombe and any more injuries could hurt them.

Their preparation has been far from ideal with coach Rob Howley sent home amid a betting investigation.

Key player

Alun Wyn Jones – lock

The Wales captain may be 34 but he is still at his peak and his country will need all of his 128 caps of experience if they are to progress.

Jones is one of the best in the world at his position and can drag Wales through matches if he is required.

Alun Wyn Jones is two matches away from being Wales’ most capped player
AFP or licensors

Full squad

Forwards; Jake Ball (lock), Adam Beard (lock), Rhys Carre (prop), James Davies (flanker), Elliot Dee (hooker), Ryan Elias (hooker), Tomas Francis (prop), Cory Hill (lock), Wyn Jones (prop), Alun Wyn Jones (lock), Dillon Lewis (prop), Ross Moriarty (No. 8), Josh Navidi (flanker), Ken Owens (hooker), Aaron Shingler (flanker), Nicky Smith (prop), Justin Tipuric (flanker), Aaron Wainwright (flanker).

Backs; Josh Adams (wing), Hallam Amos(wing), Dan Biggar (fly-half), Aled Davies (scrum-half), Gareth Davies (scrum-half), Jonathan Davies (centre), Leigh Halfpenny (full-back), George North (wing), Hadleigh Parkes (centre), Rhys Patchell (fly-half), Owen Watkin (centre), Liam Williams (utility back), Tomos Williams (scrum-half).

Fixtures

Monday, September 23 – Georgia (11.15am)

Sunday, September 29 – Australia (8.45am)

Wednesday, October 9 – Fiji (10.45am)

Sunday, October 13 – Uruguay (9.15am)

Prediction

Quarter-finals

Scotland

Scotland are inconsistent at best and on their day they can cause real problems for the top sides, as England found out at their cost in their last two Calcutta Cup clashes.

The bad days often outweigh the good ones and a strong performance is normally followed by an implosion.

Scotland are easy on the eye with lots of skill and pace but lack the ball-carrying up front to grind out results when Plan A fails.

Key Player

Finn Russell – fly-half

On his day, Russell can be a world beater and virtually unplayable but when he is having an off day then the rest of the team seems to follow.

He has scored 137 points in 46 matches for Scotland and has flourished with Racing 92 at club level.

Finn Russell replaced All Blacks legend Dan Carter at Racing 92
Getty Images - Getty

“The Six Nations was up and down. Against Italy the first half was great, then we let in three late tries,” Russell said before the World Cup. “We had a good first period against Ireland too but slipped off again. Then the England game [a 38-38 draw at Twickenham, in which Scotland trailed by 31 points] was like that but in reverse.

“What was frustrating was we never really managed to put in an 80-minute performance. In a World Cup against the best teams on the planet you have to put in a 80-minute display every game.

“But it should be the real Scotland we see now. This is the main stage, the World Cup, so if it’s not the real Scotland we see then it will be disappointing for all of us.”

Full squad

Forwards; John Barclay (flanker), Simon Berghan (prop), Fraser Brown (hooker), Scott Cummings (lock), Allan Dell (prop), Zander Fagerson (prop), Grant Gilchrist (lock), Jonny Gray (lock), Stuart McInally (hooker), Willem Nel (prop), Gordon Reid (prop), Jamie Ritchie (flanker), Blade Thomson (back-row), Ben Toolis (lock), George Turner (hooker), Hamis Watson (flanker), Ryan Wilson (No. 8).

Backs; Darcy Graham (wing), Chris Harris (centre), Adam Hastings (fly-half), Stuart Hogg (full-back), George Horne (scrum-half), Pete Horne (utility back), Sam Johnson (centre), Blair Kinghorn (full-back), Greig Laidlaw (scrum-half), Sean Maitland (wing), Ali Price (scrum-half), Finn Russell (fly-half), Tommy Seymour (wing), Duncan Taylor (centre).

Fixtures

Sunday, September 22 – Ireland (8.45am)

Monday, September 30 – Samoa (11.15am)

Wednesday, October 9 – Russia (8.15am)

Sunday, October 13 – Japan (11.45am)

Prediction

Pool Stage

Ireland

Ireland went to number one in the world with their warm-up victory over Wales in Dublin as the early indicators for the tournament are good.

Remarkably, only once has the World Cup not been won by a side not occupying that top ranking spot.

Ireland’s record at the tournament has been dismal, though, and they have never won a knockout match in their history.

Their win over New Zealand last November was a sign that they can be world beaters but their recent loss to England may have concerned head coach Joe Schmidt.

They have been handed a relatively kind pool but are likely to face South Africa or New Zealand in the quarter-final.

Key player

Johnny Sexton – fly-half

The world’s best player has had his injury scares ahead of the tournament and a slight dip in form during the Six Nations was uncharacteristic.

Ireland’s hopes will be linked to how well Sexton can perform at the tournament and at 34 it is now or never to guide his side to glory (or at least a knockout win).

Johnny Sexton was named as the best player in the world in 2018
AFP

Full-squad

Forwards; Rory Best (hooker), Tadhg Beirne (lock), Jack Conan (flanker), Sean Cronin (hooker), Tadhg Furlong (prop), Cian Healy (prop), Iain Henderson (lock), Dave Kilcoyne (prop), Jean Kleyn (lock), Peter O’Mahony (flanker), Andrew Porter (prop), Rhys Ruddock (flanker), James Ryan (lock), John Ryan (prop), Niall Scannell (hooker), CJ Stander (flanker), Josh van der Flier (flanker).

Backs; Bundee Aki (centre), Joey Carbery (fly-half), Jack Carty (fly-half), Andrew Conway (utility back), Keith Earls (utility back), Chris Farrell (centre), Robbie Henshaw (centre), Rob Kearney (full-back), Jordan Larmour (wing), Luke McGrath (scrum-half), Conor Murray (scrum-half), Garry Ringrose (centre), Johnny Sexton (fly-half), Jacob Stockdale (wing).

Fixtures

Sunday, September 22 – Scotland (8.45am)

Saturday, September 28 – Japan (8.15am)

Thursday, October 3 – Russia (11.45am)

Saturday, October 12 – Samoa (11.45am)

Prediction

Quarter-final

When is the next British and Irish Lions tour? Warren Gatland confirmed as Head Coach for South Africa tests

12 Jun

Warren Gatland has confirmed he will take charge of his third British and Irish Lions tour when they make the trip to South Africa.

Gatland lead the Lions to a dramatic series draw against New Zealand in 2017 and a 2-1 series win over Australia in 2013.

Warren Gatland will take charge of his third British and Irish Lions tour in South Africa in 2021
getty

The Kiwi is now set to do so again when Home Nations team travel to the face the Springboks.

Gatland will relinquish his role as Wales boss after the upcoming World Cup and will then start his official Lions duties in August 2020.

That’ll give him plenty of time to consider his options for the trip to Africa along with new Lions Chairman Jason Leonard and first full-time managing director Ben Calveley.

British and Irish Lions tour: When is it?

The Lions will head to South Africa for their tour in the summer of 2021.

While exact dates have not been confirmed as of yet, the tour will likely take place throughout June and culminate in early July.

The 2021 tour will be shorter than recent editions of the showpiece event.

The Lions have tended to play ten matches during the trips but will compete in a total of eight games this time around.

That will include a three-match test series against South Africa plus five additional games against local teams.

Warren Gatland ‘s Lions drew with New Zealand on their tour in 2017
getty

British and Irish Lions tour: What has Warren Gatland said?

On being confirmed as the Lions Head Coach once again, Gatland said: “I’m hugely honoured and delighted to lead the Lions again.

“It is exciting and a great challenge to coach the best players from the four Home Nations.

“The Lions rightly have a truly special place in the game and I jumped at the chance to be involved again when I was approached about the role.

“South Africa is a special place to play rugby.

“They have some of the most iconic stadiums in the world which will be packed full of passionate fans, and the Springboks have shown in recent times that they are back to being one of the dominant forces in the game.

“Having toured there in 2009 I know the scale of the task ahead of us – playing in South Africa presents a number of unique challenges such as playing at altitude, while the Boks will always be physical, aggressive and highly motivated.

“History tells you it’s a tough place to tour, but I am 100 per cent confident that we can go there and win. I would not be here if I thought differently.

“I’m delighted to now have everything in place to begin full-time in August 2020 as that gives me the best possible chance to plan for South Africa, but for the time being my focus is entirely on the Rugby World Cup and delivering a successful campaign for Wales.”

When is the next British and Irish Lions tour?Warren Gatland confirmed as Head Coach for South Africa Tests

12 Jun

Warren Gatland has confirmed he will take charge of his third British and Irish Lions tour when they make the trip to South Africa.

Gatland lead the Lions to a dramatic series draw against New Zealand in 2017 and a 2-1 series win over Australia in 2013.

Warren Gatland will take charge of his third British and Irish Lions tour in South Africa in 2021
getty

The Kiwi is now set to do so again when the Home Nations team travel to the face the Springboks.

Gatland will relinquish his role as Wales boss after the upcoming World Cup and will then start his official Lions duties in August 2020.

That’ll give him plenty of time to consider his options for the trip to Africa, along with new Lions Chairman Jason Leonard and first full-time managing director Ben Calveley.

British and Irish Lions tour: When is it?

The Lions will head to South Africa for their tour in the summer of 2021.

While exact dates have not been confirmed as of yet, the tour will likely take place throughout June and culminate in early July.

The 2021 tour will be shorter than recent editions of the showpiece event.

The Lions have tended to play ten matches during the trips but will compete in a total of eight games this time around.

That will include a three-match Test series against South Africa plus five additional games against local teams.

Warren Gatland ‘s Lions drew with New Zealand on their tour in 2017
getty

British and Irish Lions tour: What has Warren Gatland said?

On being confirmed as the Lions Head Coach once again, Gatland said: “I’m hugely honoured and delighted to lead the Lions again.

“It is exciting and a great challenge to coach the best players from the four Home Nations.

“The Lions rightly have a truly special place in the game and I jumped at the chance to be involved again when I was approached about the role.

“South Africa is a special place to play rugby.

“They have some of the most iconic stadiums in the world which will be packed full of passionate fans, and the Springboks have shown in recent times that they are back to being one of the dominant forces in the game.

“Having toured there in 2009 I know the scale of the task ahead of us – playing in South Africa presents a number of unique challenges such as playing at altitude, while the Boks will always be physical, aggressive and highly motivated.

“History tells you it’s a tough place to tour, but I am 100 per cent confident that we can go there and win. I would not be here if I thought differently.

“I’m delighted to now have everything in place to begin full-time in August 2020 as that gives me the best possible chance to plan for South Africa, but for the time being my focus is entirely on the Rugby World Cup and delivering a successful campaign for Wales.”

England 38-38 Scotland Six Nations: Scotland denied incredible comeback win after England score late try

16 Mar

Scotland were denied a famous win late on against England in a match that will go down as one of the great Six Nations contests.

England appeared to be cruising to victory after going 31-0 up in the first half at Twickenham.

The visitors scored six unanswered tries to take a 38-31 lead into the final minutes but a score in the dying second from George Ford saw the match end a draw.

 

Jonny May scores a try for England

Wales’ win over Cardiff completed the Grand Slam and ended England’s hopes of the championship.

Eddie Jones’ men had only lost in round three in Cardiff, while Scotland had lost their last three games, including to Wales at Murrayfield last weekend.

England scored after 66 seconds when Nowell cut in off his wing, wrong-footing his would-be tacklers, after Elliot Daly and Slade and spread the ball wide. Owen Farrell converted.

Ellis Genge came on for the injured Moon after five minutes, but there was no stopping England’s forwards as Tom Curry barged over from a lineout after Farrell opted to kick a penalty to the corner. Farrell added the extras.

Jack Nowell breaks away from the Scotland defence

Genge and Kyle Sinckler combined to puncture the Scotland defence before Joe Launchbury crashed over as England had three converted tries in the opening 15 minutes.

Ben Youngs, on his 85th Test appearance, was denied a try by the Television Match Official for a knock-on.Farrell kicked a penalty to extend England’s advantage to 24-0 after 25 minutes.

A fourth try and the accompanying bonus point soon followed.

Scotland built some territory but the ball turned over after a long throw from a lineout and England ran the ball back at the visitors.

Slade burst down the left wing and flicked the ball inside for Jonny May to cross. Farrell again converted.

The England captain was next the victim of Scottish optimism when Stuart McInally charged down Farrell’s attempted chip.

Stuart McInally breaks a tackle on his way to score

The Scotland skipper gathered the ball himself and ran 40 metres to the line, brushing off May and Farrell to score. Finn Russell converted to make the half-time score 31-7.

Scotland showed greater intensity in the second half and were rewarded after Sam Johnson and Ali Price combined and Darcy Graham showed neat footwork to go over in the corner. Russell missed the conversion in blustery conditions.

England were stunned again when Price regained his own chip and Magnus Bradbury was up in support to charge over the line. Russell’s conversion made it 19 unanswered points for the visitors, who now trailed 31-19.

Magnus Bradbury finds space for Scotland

Scotland’s fourth try – and a bonus point – followed when Russell’s missed pass freed Sean Maitland and he passed long for Graham to go over in the corner. Replacement Greig Laidlaw missed the conversion attempt.

Russell intercepted Farrell’s pass and scored Scotland’s fifth try. Laidlaw’s conversion from under the posts levelled the scores at 31-31 with 20 minutes to go.

The remarkable comeback appeared to be completed when Scotland scored their sixth try but in the dying seconds England responded with their own try to see the entertaining contest end in a draw.

Six Nations 2019 permutations explained: Can England or Ireland win it? Will bonus points come into play?

16 Mar

This season’s Six Nations is set for a thrilling conclusion today with three countries still in title contention.

Wales, England and Ireland can all win silverware with the former currently top of the table with four wins from four.

Wales take on Ireland this weekend while England face Scotland and there are a host of possible ways to where the trophy will end up.

Wales are in pole position in the Six Nations

What are the permutations?

  • Wales will win the Six Nations title and clinch a first Grand Slam for seven years if they beat Ireland in Cardiff.
  • If Wales and England finish level on 20 points, which is quite possible, then Wales will still be crowned champions as Grand Slam winners are automatically awarded three bonus points under Six Nations rules.
  • A draw between Wales and Ireland – and England losing to Scotland at Twickenham – would see Wales win the title without a Grand Slam.
  • A draw between Wales and Ireland – and England beating Scotland – would see England crowned champions.
  • If Ireland beat Wales and England defeat Scotland, then England will be champions.
  • If Ireland beat Wales and England fail to beat Scotland, then Ireland will be champions.
  • If Ireland beat Wales and gain a bonus point and England beat Scotland but don’t gain a bonus point, then England will be champions due to their superior points difference barring an unlikely 65-point swing in Ireland’s favour.

What about the bonus points system?

A bonus point is awarded in the Six Nations if you score four or more tries or if you lose within seven points.

England have been at their attacking best at times in this tournament claiming three bonus points in their matches so far.

But Wales have had to make do with collecting just the four points per win and are yet to get any extras.

England take on Scotland in the final weekend of the Six Nations

Yet, if Warren Gatland’s side go onto win all five matches, they are automatically awarded three bonus points for achieving the Grand Slam.

This would ensure they lift the Six Nations title, even if England get maximum points in their final fixture.

England can only get 20 points at most in tournament, while Wales will get a minimum 23 points if they remain undefeated.

What are the remaining Six Nations fixtures?

Saturday, March 16

Italy v France: 12:30pm, Stadio Olimpico

Wales v Ireland: 2:45pm, Millennium Stadium

England v Scotland: 5pm, Twickenham

Ireland can still win the Six Nations

England 38-38 Scotland Six Nations: Scotland denied incredible comeback win after England score late try

16 Mar

Scotland were denied a famous win late on against England in a match that will go down as one of the great Six Nations contests.

England appeared to be cruising to victory after going 31-0 up in the first half at Twickenham.

The visitors scored six unanswered tries to take a 38-31 lead into the final minutes but a score in the dying second from George Ford saw the match end a draw.

 

Jonny May scores a try for England

Wales’ win over Cardiff completed the Grand Slam and ended England’s hopes of the championship.

Eddie Jones’ men had only lost in round three in Cardiff, while Scotland had lost their last three games, including to Wales at Murrayfield last weekend.

England scored after 66 seconds when Nowell cut in off his wing, wrong-footing his would-be tacklers, after Elliot Daly and Slade and spread the ball wide. Owen Farrell converted.

Ellis Genge came on for the injured Moon after five minutes, but there was no stopping England’s forwards as Tom Curry barged over from a lineout after Farrell opted to kick a penalty to the corner. Farrell added the extras.

Jack Nowell breaks away from the Scotland defence

Genge and Kyle Sinckler combined to puncture the Scotland defence before Joe Launchbury crashed over as England had three converted tries in the opening 15 minutes.

Ben Youngs, on his 85th Test appearance, was denied a try by the Television Match Official for a knock-on.Farrell kicked a penalty to extend England’s advantage to 24-0 after 25 minutes.

A fourth try and the accompanying bonus point soon followed.

Scotland built some territory but the ball turned over after a long throw from a lineout and England ran the ball back at the visitors.

Slade burst down the left wing and flicked the ball inside for Jonny May to cross. Farrell again converted.

The England captain was next the victim of Scottish optimism when Stuart McInally charged down Farrell’s attempted chip.

Stuart McInally breaks a tackle on his way to score

The Scotland skipper gathered the ball himself and ran 40 metres to the line, brushing off May and Farrell to score. Finn Russell converted to make the half-time score 31-7.

Scotland showed greater intensity in the second half and were rewarded after Sam Johnson and Ali Price combined and Darcy Graham showed neat footwork to go over in the corner. Russell missed the conversion in blustery conditions.

England were stunned again when Price regained his own chip and Magnus Bradbury was up in support to charge over the line. Russell’s conversion made it 19 unanswered points for the visitors, who now trailed 31-19.

Magnus Bradbury finds space for Scotland

Scotland’s fourth try – and a bonus point – followed when Russell’s missed pass freed Sean Maitland and he passed long for Graham to go over in the corner. Replacement Greig Laidlaw missed the conversion attempt.

Russell intercepted Farrell’s pass and scored Scotland’s fifth try. Laidlaw’s conversion from under the posts levelled the scores at 31-31 with 20 minutes to go.

The remarkable comeback appeared to be completed when Scotland scored their sixth try but in the dying seconds England responded with their own try to see the entertaining contest end in a draw.

Six Nations 2019 permutations explained: Can England or Ireland win it? Will bonus points come into play?

15 Mar

This season’s Six Nations is set for a thrilling conclusion today with three countries still in title contention.

Wales, England and Ireland can all win silverware with the former currently top of the table with four wins from four.

Wales take on Ireland this weekend while England face Scotland and there are a host of possible ways to where the trophy will end up.

Wales are in pole position in the Six Nations

What are the permutations?

  • Wales will win the Six Nations title and clinch a first Grand Slam for seven years if they beat Ireland in Cardiff.
  • If Wales and England finish level on 20 points, which is quite possible, then Wales will still be crowned champions as Grand Slam winners are automatically awarded three bonus points under Six Nations rules.
  • A draw between Wales and Ireland – and England losing to Scotland at Twickenham – would see Wales win the title without a Grand Slam.
  • A draw between Wales and Ireland – and England beating Scotland – would see England crowned champions.
  • If Ireland beat Wales and England defeat Scotland, then England will be champions.
  • If Ireland beat Wales and England fail to beat Scotland, then Ireland will be champions.
  • If Ireland beat Wales and gain a bonus point and England beat Scotland but don’t gain a bonus point, then England will be champions due to their superior points difference barring an unlikely 65-point swing in Ireland’s favour.

What about the bonus points system?

A bonus point is awarded in the Six Nations if you score four or more tries or if you lose within seven points.

England have been at their attacking best at times in this tournament claiming three bonus points in their matches so far.

But Wales have had to make do with collecting just the four points per win and are yet to get any extras.

England take on Scotland in the final weekend of the Six Nations

Yet, if Warren Gatland’s side go onto win all five matches, they are automatically awarded three bonus points for achieving the Grand Slam.

This would ensure they lift the Six Nations title, even if England get maximum points in their final fixture.

England can only get 20 points at most in tournament, while Wales will get a minimum 23 points if they remain undefeated.

What are the remaining Six Nations fixtures?

Saturday, March 16

Italy v France: 12:30pm, Stadio Olimpico

Wales v Ireland: 2:45pm, Millennium Stadium

England v Scotland: 5pm, Twickenham

Ireland can still win the Six Nations

England vs Scotland: Gregor Townsend makes six changes for Six Nations clash at Twickenham

14 Mar

Sean Maitland, Hamish Watson and Sam Skinner have been recalled by Gregor Townsend for Scotland’s Six Nations clash against England on Saturday.

The Dark Blues coach has made six changes to the team that lost to Wales last weekend, with wing Byron McGuigan, centre Sam Johnson and lock Ben Toolis also brought for the Twickenham match up.

Townsend has rung the changes for Saturday’s trip south of the border

Dropping out are the injured trio of Tommy Seymour, Blair Kinghorn and Jamie Ritchie plus Peter Horne, while Josh Strauss and Jonny Gray move to the bench.

Scotland head to London hoping to arrest a run of three straight defeats but they have not beaten England at Twickenham since 1983.

Townsend said: “First of all we have to build on the positive aspects of our performance from last weekend against Wales, when we were able to generate quick ball and build a lot of pressure on the opposition.

“The character and fitness the players displayed in the second half showed what the team is capable of against one of the best sides in the world. The next step is making that pressure count on the scoreboard, more regularly.

“Winning away from home tends to be achieved through an outstanding defensive performance and we are determined to deliver that this Saturday. At times against Wales we weren’t aggressive or accurate enough so that has been a focus for us this week in training.”

England’s Grand Slam bid was wrecked by defeat to Wales but they can still claim the title if Warren Gatland’s side slip up at home to Ireland.

Townsend added: “England are a quality side and have been playing really well throughout the championship.

“They have shown a different game plan this season which is built on power, both through direct ball carrying and also getting off the line in defence.

“They’ve kicked the ball more than any other team in the Guinness Six Nations, which has worked well for them and produced tries, and it also shows that they are more than comfortable defending for several phases.”

Townsend has had to contend with a nightmare injury list this campaign but backed the men he has available to put up a fight against Eddie Jones’ team.

Eddie Jones’ side can still win the Six Nations but their Grand Slam bid has ended
Getty Images

“Both Sam Skinner and Ben Toolis started for us against Italy and deserve another opportunity to show what they can do in a blue jersey,” Townsend said.

“While it’s tough on Jamie to miss this game through injury, we’re delighted to bring back Hamish Watson into the starting line-up. He made a real impact on Saturday and we have no doubt that he’s ready to take the game to the opposition in attack and defence.

“Sam brings a lot of set-piece nous and gives us good balance in the back-row and we are keen to give Magnus Bradbury an opportunity to start at number eight.

“Sam Johnson gets an opportunity to build on his strong performances against Italy and Ireland, while it’s good to have Sean Maitland back in the back three alongside Darcy Graham and Byron.

“These three players, and the team as a whole, will have to put in a lot of work off the ball to counter this threat on Saturday.”