Ex-Arsenal goalkeeper David Seaman reveals Patrick Vieira didn’t speak to him for two weeks after training ground fight

29 Aug

Newcastle United team-mates Matt Ritchie and Jamaal Lascelles’ training ground bust-up has got people talking.

It’s not a new thing to see players rucking with each other and on talkSPORT, former Arsenal goalkeeper David Seaman explained that not only had he seen it happen regularly, he was also involved in some training ground argy-bargy, too.

“That happens a lot and it happened at Arsenal,” he told the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast when discussing the Newcastle story.

“I got involved with Patrick Vieira once. He wound me up a little bit.

“We’d be playing 8 v 8 [in training] and everytime I’d go up for the ball he’d have a little niggle with an elbow. It was funny to start with and then he carried on.

“I’d be like, ‘okay, just to take it easy’ but then I went up for a cross and his elbow hit me on the side of the head and I just saw the red mist.

“When I came back down I landed on him, pulled my fist back to punch him, but thought I’d better not so I just gave him a little, tap shall we say, on his forehead and he wasn’t happy.

Seaman and Vieira spent seven years at Arsenal together, but it wasn’t always smiles and giggles

“He didn’t speak to me for two weeks,” adding that in addition to his minor squabble with the former Gunners captain, Seaman has also had to act as the peacemaker, including in more than one spat involving Ian Wright.

“I’ve seen Wrighty and Nigel Winterburn have a right good old ding-dong. Wrighty was involved in a few, Tony [Adams] would leave a bit on people and there was a lot of squaring up.”

It clearly didn’t do the team any harm because, under manager Arsene Wenger, who arrived in 1996, Arsenal won three Premier Leagues and seven FA Cups with Seaman winning two of those titles and three FA Cup winners medals under the Frenchman.

“The little five-a-sides in the gym were naughty, but feisty,” Seaman continued. “Back in the day when Arsene first came in, training sessions were competitive because we knew he’d pick players from training and the standard was high.”